2D/3D Digital Animation

2D/3D Digital Animation

Encompasses all the animation techniques that are done exclusively with the use of computers. With digital animation, it is possible to do both 2D (two-dimensional) and 3D (three-dimensional) animation. Here are some of the digital animation techniques.

Step 1: → Gathering information
Step 2: → Concept & Script
Step 3: → Voiceover recording
Step 4: → Storyboard
Step 5: → Visual style
Step 6: → Animation
Match the order of the Animation production process
ArcsEven gross body movements when you walk somewhere tend not be perfectly straight. When a hand/arm reaches out to reach something, it tends to move
AnticipationOne of the 12 Principles of Animation :
ExaggerationIt should be used in a careful and balanced manner, not arbitrarily. The result will be that the animation will seem more realistic and entertaining.
Straight Ahead Action and Pose-To-Pose ActionFor example, the animator draws the first frame of the animation, then draws the second, and so on until the sequence is complete. In this way, there is one drawing or image per frame that the animator has setup. This approach tends to yield a more creative and fresh look but can be difficult to time correctly and tweak.
STOP MOTION TECHNIQUEIt is a technique that manipulates an object physically so that it appears to move on its own. The object is moved in small steps between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames are played in a fast sequence
DRAWING ANIMATIONThe background and the characters are flat and can be filmed from only one side. Traditional drawing animation is done in a non-chronological way, developing first the main action, and filling it up with background images later on.
CUT-OUT ANIMATIONOne of the Animation Techniques:
Still lifeBasic Drawing and Composition of basic elements
Squash and StretchThis is a way of deforming an object such that it shows how rigid the object is. For example if a rubber ball bounces and hits the ground it will tend to flatten when it hits.
Secondary ActionBut it is something that the character is doing/acting that adds a more realistic and natural feel to the animation. As mentioned, it must be staged so that the main action isn’t overpowered. It’s the kind of thing that is usually more subtle or can be felt more than noticed immediately.
THREE DIMENSIONAL PUPPET ANIMATIONtype of stop-motion animation produced by moving twodimensional pieces of material, paper or cloth. The background has to be fixed to the table and everything on the background
PIXELATIONInvolves the use of real persons as stop motion characters. This allows a number of surreal effects, including the disappearance and reappearance of objects or characters, as well as allowing people to appear to slide across the ground and other effects.
Textureis the surface quality of a shape, or how it appears to feel: rough, smooth, spiky, soft, hard, and glossy, etc. Texture can be real or implied.
SIGNS, SYMBOLSimportant to convey meaning through process of smiotics, denotation and cognitions
IMAGES/ILLUSTRATIONSimportant to drive or support an idea
WORDSimportant to communicate messages in different ways
PROPORTIONSimportant to define focal point
COLORSimportant to make a powerful communication and to drive the attention
SHAPESimportant to help the creative team to put into a harmony pattern the constitutive elements
CompositionThe way you arrange or divide the space in your artwork. Do not have a lot of empty space in your art.
Dynamic EquilibriuExciting balance active, exciting, not boring
CharcoalCompressed burned wood used for drawing. Charcoal is so fast, direct and responsive, that it is amongst the least inhibiting media. It can produce bold and fluid lines, and a great host of textures
Contrastthe extreme differences in values, colors, textures or other elements
Gestural drawingused to block in the layout of the basic shapes in the composition. Best compared to a scribble drawing. Seeks to express motion and/or emotive qualities of the composition.
ChiraoscuroAn Italian word that means boldly contrasting light and dark. The technique of was developed during the Renaissance.
Shape / Formis a self-contained defined area, either geometric or organic. Shape refers to a two-dimensional element with area on a plane, while form refers to a threedimensional element with volume in space.
COLORis the visible spectrum of radiation reflected from an object. Color is also sometimes referred to as hue.
Seven Elements of Design Lineis a continuous mark made on a surface or the edge created when two shapes meet. May be actual, implied, vertical, horizontal, diagonal, and/or contour.
Spaceis the distance or area around or between elements in a work.
TimingThe speed at which something moves gives a sense of what the object is, the weight of an object, and why it is moving. Something like an eye blink can be fast or slow. If it’s fast, a character will seem alert and awake.
Ease In and Out (or Slow In and Out)For example, a bouncing ball tends to have a lot of ease in and out when at the top of its bounce. As it goes up, gravity affects it and slows down , then it starts its downward motion more and more rapidly
ArcsEven gross body movements when you walk somewhere tend not be perfectly straight. When a hand/arm reaches out to reach something, it tends to move
AnticipationOne of the 12 Principles of Animation
CUT-OUT ANIMATION:One of the Animation Techniques:
Drawing from observationBasic Drawing and Composition of basic elements
Valuerefers to how light or dark an object, area, or element is, independent of its color. Value is also sometimes referred to as tone.